How To Survive A Shutdown

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I really wish this was an article about the government shutdown. It would be a lot more satisfying to spend the next 1200-odd words comparing members of Congress to the small, misshapen toadstools you find in the pond next to a toxic waste dump. I mean, they can’t expect us to praise them for failing to do their actual job, right? Last time I checked, if a person couldn’t demonstrate any real skill or talent, they’d get fired. (*This rule doesn’t apply to Kardashians, or other reality television stars— including Donald Trump.)

No, this isn’t about a government shutdown. Rather, this is about another shutdown of a far more frightening sort. The kind that makes your hair turn white and causes you to question your own mortality.

Yes, it’s a wheelchair shutdown.

I have one of those custom motorized wheelchairs— the kind with oodles of special features designed to maximize my comfort, independence and mobility. This thing has a personalized seating system, a reclining feature, and six tires that allow me to turn in a small enough space to fit at least 4 or 5 Olsen twins.

This is handy so that I can get into smaller areas like a bathroom or a pantry— where I can grab a box of Cheez-Its without waiting for someone to do it for me. Anything that makes it easier for me to grab food to stuff into my face is a huge, valued part of my life.

Anyway, these wheelchairs are designed specifically for each patient. From the dimensions of the seating system to the height off the ground— it’s all perfectly designed to me. In fact, even the NASA-inspired honeycomb seat cushion is created to fit my buttocks. It’s like a designer Gucci purse for my ass.

While this may sound extravagant to some, if you had to spend 12 hours a day sitting in one chair, it had better be amazing. Not some piece of shit you bought at a garage sale.

These specialized chairs are not interchangeable. If something goes wrong with my wheelchair, I’m majorly… well… fucked. I can’t borrow a wheelchair to use until mine gets fixed. There’s no Hertz Rent-A-Car for custom wheelchairs.

I think you can sense where I am going with this, right?

A couple of weeks ago, a fault message appeared on the screen of my joystick— “Right Motor Fault.” I had just gotten into my chair and the morning had been bright with promise. I had a caramel vanilla coffee waiting for me and a whole list of things planned for my day. It was going to be GREAT. The kind of day where I accomplished a lot of paperwork— yet still had time to make a pot of chicken noodle soup and watch two or three episodes of The Crown on Netflix. Yeah, it was supposed to be that kind of day.

But, upon seeing that error message on the screen, my mood immediately plummeted. It went from GREAT DAY to… JESUS, MY LIFE IS OVER.

You see, my chair would not move.

Heart pounding, my mind began to race. I turned off the power, let the wheelchair sit for a moment, and took 3 deep breaths so I wouldn’t hyperventilate. Then, I tried the chair again. This time, the motors activated and moved.

While you may think I was ecstatic, relieved, joyous— I decidedly was not. My relief was measured, cautious— for I knew that a motor fault error was a sign of impending doom. Like a meteor heading to Earth or a Black Friday sale at Best Buy. Someone—somewhere— was going to get screwed over by a 60’ LCD television for $180. And that person was me. It was inevitable.

This was the third set of motors I had installed on my wheelchair— even though the chair is less than seven years old. So, I knew all the signs. The cheap toys in a McDonald’s Happy Meal have a longer shelf life than my shitty motors. You’d think that a manufacturer of a beautifully designed wheelchair could manage to put well-engineered motors on it, too. But, no.

I guess we cripples can’t be choosers.

For the next couple of days, the specter of malfunction hung in the air— I knew the motor error would happen again, it was only a matter of time. So, I did what any organized, thoughtful person would do. I called my local wheelchair company to give them a heads-up that sometime in the next week, or so, my life was going to go down the toilet.

Then, I called my doctor to have him fax a prescription for “motorized wheelchair repair” to the aforementioned wheelchair company. Yes, the prescription really does say that. Who knew that prescriptions weren’t only for antibiotics and Lipitor… or, if you’re Bill Cosby, then Quaaludes?

These repair parts take time to come in, so I knew I needed to get the order in pronto. Stat. ¡Muy rápido!

I also knew that there was no way in hell that my current motors were going to last until their replacements arrived.

And, I was right. A few days later, after sporadic functionality, my chair stopped for good. ‘Right Motor Fault’ had won.

I had to be pushed around in my chair like a giant cart of bottled water at Costco. Or one of those pathetic drivers that runs out of gas and gets stranded on a freeway.

I couldn’t do anything.

My life stopped.

You know the old saying that sailors have a potty mouth? Well, even the shadiest pirate in 1790 had nothing on me at this point. I was a bundle of anxiety and curse words. I couldn’t say one sentence without at least two to three versions of the word ‘fuck’ in it. As a verb, adjective, adverb— I’m not sure there was a part of speech I didn’t use.

Then, once I had exhausted myself, I called the local wheelchair company in tears a couple of times. It wasn’t pretty.

Some old smart British dude once said, “Necessity is the mother of invention.” I think anger and rage also are, too. After a hunt in my garage, we found an old set of motors that had been leaky (but functional). So, we swapped the leaky right motor for my dead one and said a prayer to the Broken Wheelchair Gods.

It worked. And the chair continued to work for another week until the new motors arrived from the shitty motor factory in The-City-Shall-Not-Be-Named, Ohio.

But, that week was still pure torture. I’d get up in the morning, get into the chair, and I’d feel my heart rate go up by about 20 points before turning on the joystick. Each time the motor fault error didn’t appear felt like Christmas morning all over again. Not the Christmas morning of recent years (you know, as a boring adult), but the Christmas morning of childhood— when Santa brings you a big box of Legos or a My Little Pony with glittery, purple hair.

Yes, it really was that good.

Now that this current crisis is behind me, though, it means that I must start thinking about the process of getting a new wheelchair sometime soon. Given how precise and perfect the seat and chair must be, you can understand how I might approach this with dread.

I’m sure I’ll be writing about the process in the coming months… so, stay tuned.

Keep your fingers crossed that these motors don’t die first, though.

At the rate I’m going, it’s not looking promising…

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The DNA Don’t Lie

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It’s been a whirlwind few weeks since the announcement of the FDA approval of Spinraza— the first-ever treatment for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

Considering I had never heard of Spinraza until a few weeks ago, it’s amazing how fast a new word can enter a person’s vocabulary. It’s like when we were introduced to the expression “hanging chad” during the 2000 Presidential Election. No one had heard of a hanging chad before, and suddenly it became the most important thing in determining how to count votes in Florida— which in turn would decide who would become the President of the United States. It was all anyone could talk about— like that one time when Janet Jackson flashed her boob at the Super Bowl.

In case you are wondering what a “hanging chad” is, it’s what happens when a person voting using a punch-out ballot doesn’t push the little circle all the way out of the paper.

It’s not surprising the 2000 election kerfuffle happened in Florida. Everything weird happens in Florida. Those people are so chronically dehydrated from their ridiculous humidity that they don’t have the strength or clarity of mind to do much at all— let alone punch out a ballot correctly. I know I can’t even remember my own damn name if the temperature climbs too high.

Anyway, it’s rather remarkable that Spinraza, a word I’ve never uttered until recently, I now say at least three or four times a day. That’s nearly the number of times I utter the word f#%$. So, yeah, that’s a lot.

As I’ve documented on this blog, previously, I’ve begun the process to get Spinraza. And, “process” is definitely a way to describe it. They aren’t just giving this stuff away— like it’s a free donut at Krispy Kreme or a cabinet position in the Trump administration. No, they want me to earn it.

Today, I’m one step closer to achieving this goal. To qualify, a big component is having a DNA test on file showing my SMA gene configuration and my number of SMN2 copies. This is required because Spinraza may only work for those who meet certain parameters.

While a DNA test has been the standard way to diagnose SMA in recent years, I had never had this done before. I was diagnosed by muscle biopsy as a toddler, instead. I still have a two-inch white scar on my left thigh as a memento of the occasion. Good times.

Even if I had wanted it, DNA screening wasn’t around when I was diagnosed in the 80s. Yet, we did have lots of other things worthy of note that decade— like Cabbage Patch Kids… the Berlin Wall… and Bill Cosby before we found out he was such a pervert.

But, today, I’m one step closer to achieving my goal. I just got my DNA results and… *drumroll please* … It’s official, I do have Spinal Muscular Atrophy! And 3 copies of the SMN2 gene!

I know that may sound anticlimactic. But, I suppose it’s good to know I just haven’t been faking this for the last 35 years. I really am disabled. Yay, me!

Now that this hurdle has been cleared, I move on to the next step… getting insurance approval. Given the revolutionary nature of this treatment, and the limited folks that can use it, it comes with a hefty price tag— $750,000 for the first year… $375,000 per year, thereafter.

Yes, you read those numbers right. It’s not a typo.

My doctor at Stanford expects insurances to fall into line, but there’s no guarantee. So, keep your fingers crossed for me. I’m gonna need it.
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XOXO