Test Anxiety

Standard

No one likes tests. Whether they’re in school, at the doctor, or at the DMV— they are generally un-fun. You rarely hear someone yell, “Yay, a test! I’m SO happy.” If a person did say that, you’d probably question their mental stability.

For a lot of folks, tests bring out an anxiety— a stress to perform well, which, ironically, is made harder by the stress itself. It’s a terrible Catch-22.

I have to do well on this test or I’ll never go to college!

I have to pass this exam or I can’t get my license!

Will that marijuana I smoked a month ago show up on this urine test!?

As a worrywart, high-achieving student, I generally would experience some anxiety before tests, especially the big exams— like the AP test, the LSAT, and all those personality tests on the internet. I’d fret for days beforehand, wondering how it would all turn out. Would I score well enough on the LSAT to get into law school?… Would the online test sort me into Hufflepuff or, worse yet, Slytherin House?!

These thoughts would consume me.

It shouldn’t be surprising that when it was time for me to have another evaluation to check my progress on Spinraza, I worried about it. A lot.

While I had felt positive changes, and experienced measurable improvements previously, would it still translate to results this time?

It was a question that loomed over me… like the Hindenburg right before it exploded.

I’m sure reading this, you’re probably thinking, “Girl, calm down. Don’t stress. Just do the best you can.

I wish it were that simple. Given the high price tag associated with nusinersen treatments, there are many insurances and government agencies that are looking to limit who has access to the drug. They want to put parameters on who can get it and who can’t. And a major factor they are looking at is age.

As an adult in my thirties with Spinal Muscular Atrophy, I am considered old. Not old in the way that Betty White is old, but at least old in a moderate way… like Jane Fonda or Donald Trump.

While there aren’t THAT many of us that have lived this long with SMA, there are still plenty of us adults out there that need access to this drug. So, we have to continue to prove that this treatment works for adults. That it produces results.

That’s a lot of pressure. Especially for something that a person can only do SO much about. I can do stretching, breathing exercises, and increase my protein to help things along, but that’s about it. I mainly have to see if the magical Spinraza droplets do their work.

Leading up to my evaluation at Stanford earlier this week, I was very anxious about it. On the drive over, I listened to the Spinraza mixed CD I had made and tried to gear myself up. It worked pretty well… after all, track #2, Eye of the Tiger, is always a solid choice.

Upon arrival to the Neuroscience Center, I only had time to inhale half of a tuna sandwich before they called me back to begin my evaluation. The next three SOLID hours passed in a blur of respiratory and physical therapists, nurses, research assistants, and stress sweat (good thing I put on extra deodorant!).

I wasn’t finished with one test before another person was hovering nearby to begin the next. I didn’t even have time to eat my homemade graham cracker and peanut butter sandwiches. (And you know how much I love peanut butter!)

The grueling afternoon reached its peak when the physical therapist asked me to open up one of those clear round Ziploc containers with the blue lid. Previously, I hadn’t even been able to attempt this task. Not even close. But, this time, I felt that I might be able to do it. I pulled, groaned, heaved, and nearly cried. But, after five minutes of desperately trying (and nearly doing it), I ran out of steam. I felt defeated. And pissed off. I told the PT, “I’m gonna buy one of these fucking containers and practice this at home. Next time, I will do this.

Yeah, I’m that kind of person.

While that moment was very disheartening, I’m happy to say that my results showed some improvements. I was able to lift a cup with a weight inside all the way up to my mouth. The strength in my arms and hands increased. And, lastly, but most awesomely, there’s a respiratory test that measures the diaphragm muscle. Before Spinraza, I got a 50. At this evaluation, I got a 72.

By the time all of this was done, I was exhausted. I wanted to curl up in bed with hot chocolate and watch TV forever. All the shows. Even the stupid ones on Bravo… Like The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills.

Thankfully, I get a little break now. I don’t have to head back to Stanford until next month for dose #6. I’m looking forward to the respite… and the break from all these tests.

Although, if I get bored, I’m sure there is a personality test online I can find. Like… If you were a dog, what breed would you be?

A border collie. Definitely.

neuro

For more updates, don’t forget to subscribe to my blog in the sidebar!

buymeacoffee

8 thoughts on “Test Anxiety

  1. This is a very well-written piece, and it captures my feelings entirely. Even though my physical progress has not been too much, I have improved in my general condition thanks to Spinraza.

    I thought about them pulling the plug on my treatments, really stresses me out because I feel that at my age (62) I deserve it. No one should be left out of a chance to improve themselves, no matter the cost. Unfortunately, the “bottom line” always figures into these situations, even though it is very unjust.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Philip Sarasqueta

    Seems to me it’s a lot easier to get somebody to open a Zip lock lid than to breathe for you. You did well on the most important test. But I do admire your spunk. Good news, Elizabette!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Anne MacDonald

    Way to go Elizabette!!! Keep up the good works and keep practicing your exercises!!! Put on some good music and let it rip!!! Hugs forwarded on to you forever!!!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s