Boogers, Rainy Days & Surviving Dose #5

Standard

It’s been well-documented that, like many with Spinal Muscular Atrophy, I’m a verifiable germaphobe. If a person could earn a certification in Cootie-Evasive-Techniques, I’d have a damn Class A license. The kind that people stand in line at the DMV for 3 hours to get.

Strike that. There’s no way in hell that I could go to the DMV and stand in line for three hours. I once heard someone cough up their gallbladder at the DMV. There are enough germs in those offices to keep the Centers for Disease Control busy for at least 6 or 7 months. Eww.

So, yeah.

Anyway, if you’ve been following my Spinraza journey, you’d know that the date for my first maintenance dose had been fast approaching. Given the importance of these spinal injections, and the set schedule of receiving them, it’s vital that nothing interfere with a dose.

Nothing.

Not even a plague of locusts, a doomsday asteroid or a Buy One Get One Free sale at the GAP.

Seriously. I don’t care how much I love those long-sleeve tees.

Given that we’re in the midst of a raging cold & flu season, I’d been paranoid that I would catch a bug prior to my Spinraza treatment. This fear paralyzed me for weeks. I avoided going out in public places, I tried limiting my interactions with family and friends. I basically became a hermit. Like the Unabomber. Only I didn’t try to build explosives out of fertilizer, chicken wire and cherry-flavored bubblegum. (Yes, I remember the show MacGyver.)

But, then, Christmas happened.

And, I really, really like Christmas.

You can probably guess what happened next.

Yup— I caught a respiratory virus.

The symptoms started about 10 days before my Spinraza injection. It wasn’t long before I had a river of fluid coming out of my nose. I’m sorry to be so graphic, but I have very little filter when it comes to these things.

After consuming my first box of Kleenex, I began to notice something. I felt a burst of joy— and not all of it was because of my low-grade fever.

You see, I was able to blow my nose harder than I had been able to do for a very, very long time. Like years. At least since the Bush Administration (the 2nd dude, not the 1st dude). I was able to blow so hard into the Kleenex that my ears actually popped.

This may not seem like a big deal, but before Spinraza, I couldn’t do this. Nasal drainage would simply slither down into my lungs, and I would struggle for weeks to get all the damn stuff out. This was a striking difference.

This development invigorated me. I wasn’t going to let this piece-of-shit virus get in the way of my Spinraza treatment. After all, I clearly needed more of the stuff so I could keep ejecting all those boogers out of my nose.

So, armed with antibiotics, breathing treatments, and a fuck-ton of garlic (seriously, I smelled SO bad), I made it through that week to Spinraza Day.

The early morning arrived and we were greeted with the first rainy day in, like, months. So much rain hit California that all the dirt decided to just turn into rivers and carry folks away. Not cool.

Luckily for me, even though the visibility was dodgy at times, we slowly made our way over to Stanford— safely. Upon arriving, I began to get nervous.

Could I sit still during the procedure without having to cough or blow my nose? After all, moving or twitching while two doctors inject a giant needle into your spinal fluid really doesn’t sound like a good idea. Just like buying sushi from the back of a van isn’t a good idea.

After checking-in and getting settled into the room, the nurse told me that the Spinraza Gods had blessed me once again. The same amazing duo that did my last procedure were back for the day. It felt like the rainy heavens had opened up and a damn Puccini opera was playing just for me.

YAAAASSSS!

In case you’re wondering why I was so excited, here’s the deal: there’s no way to know which doctors will be on-call that day. Stanford is a teaching hospital, so the rotations are random and unexpected. The time this procedure can take varies widely— depending upon the doctors. The longer the procedure takes, the more painful and arduous it becomes.

And these two doctors didn’t disappoint. They had the needle in so quickly, that I didn’t even have time to cough or blow my nose. It was glorious.

The rainstorm continued on the drive home, but I was so delirious with relief that I didn’t even mind. I was exhausted. Spent. Relieved. And, yes… slightly full of snot.

I get a little break before my injection, so I will enjoy these months— hopefully without viral invaders.

Wish me luck!

For more updates on my progress, don’t forget to subscribe to my blog in the sidebar.

xo

dose5

3 thoughts on “Boogers, Rainy Days & Surviving Dose #5

  1. Elizabette,

    I was also rather paranoid about germs before my last loading dose. I came down with some wheezing in my chest, and I almost panicked. Luckily, it turned out to be nothing.

    As a result of the Spinraza (I believe), my voice has gotten stronger as well as my breathing. Over the last few days, I’ve noticed that I can now hunch my shoulders and turn my back farther than I have been able to in years.

    I am starting to be more grateful than ever that I decided to pursue this route.

    Liked by 1 person

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